Monday, October 16, 2017
 
NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in...

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in...

On Friday, August 25, U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy will sail from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, with a team of NOAA scientists and collaborators on a 22-day cruise to study environmental change in the western Arctic Ocean.

New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off...

Thursday, July 13, 2017

New model reveals how ocean acidification challenges tiny sea snails off...

A tiny sea snail, sometimes called a sea butterfly because of how it flutters about traveling the ocean currents, is part of the diet for such valuable fish as salmon and cod off the U.S West Coast. A new study models the journey of this delicate plankton from offshore to nearshore waters, describing how changing ocean chemistry along this journey affects their condition.

Summer of sailing drones

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Summer of sailing drones

Over the next four months, NOAA scientists will launch unmanned ocean vehicles, called Saildrones, from the Arctic to the tropical Pacific Ocean to help better understand how changes in the ocean are affecting weather, climate, fisheries and marine mammals. The wind and solar-powered research vehicles that resemble a sailboat will travel thousands of miles across the ocean, reaching some areas never before surveyed with such specialized technology. 

Cracking the code of a long-distance swimmer

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Cracking the code of a long-distance swimmer

Born in the Sargasso Sea, that Atlantic Ocean gyre east of Bermuda, baby European eels will travel 4,000 miles to the freshwater rivers of Europe. Now scientists might have answered a century-old question of how these young eels accomplish such vast oceanic migrations.


Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, potentially affecting shellfish, other marine species in the food web, and communities that depend on these resources, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by NOAA, Chinese marine scientists and other partners.


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