Sunday, June 25, 2017
 
April 27 Reddit AMA: Tornado! Talk Severe Weather Research & Prediction with NOAA

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April 27 Reddit AMA: Tornado! Talk Severe Weather Research & Prediction with NOAA

Spring has arrived and with it come efforts to study and learn to better predict severe weather like tornadoes. Join NOAA for a Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA) on severe weather research and prediction on April 27, 2017.

Climate change increased chances of record rains in Louisiana by at least 40 percent

NOAA and partners conduct rapid assessment of devastating August rains

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Climate change increased chances of record rains in Louisiana by at least 40 percent

Human-caused climate warming increased the chances of the torrential rains that unleashed devastating floods in south Louisiana in mid August by at least 40 percent, according to a team of NOAA and partner scientists with World Weather Attribution (WWA) who conducted a rapid assessment of the role of climate on the historic heavy rain event. 

Climate change not to blame for 2013 Colorado floods

Heavy multi-day summer rain events not expected to increase in the area

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Climate change not to blame for 2013 Colorado floods

Last September’s widespread flooding in northeast Colorado, which saw just over 17 inches of rain in one week in the city of Boulder, was not made more likely or more intense by the effects of human-induced climate change, according to a new NOAA-led study published today in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

 

Colorado mountain hail may disappear in a warmer future

NOAA-led study shows less hail, more rain in region’s future, with possible increase in flood risk

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Colorado mountain hail may disappear in a warmer future

Summertime hail could all but disappear from the eastern flank of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains by 2070, according to a new modeling study by scientists from NOAA and several other institutions.

Florida's Fragile Oasis

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Florida's Fragile Oasis

Surrounded by ocean moisture, Florida is an oasis sitting right in the middle of the desert belt, which traverses the subtropical latitudes north and south of the equator. But even oases sometimes go dry.

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